Natural News Archive

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Oak tree extract cools symptoms of burnout

Daily supplementation with an extract from oak wood may help reduce symptoms of fatigue associated with burnout syndrome, according to new evidence.

21 July, 2018

Black tea aromatherapy? It could aid stress

Before you drink your tea try inhaling it. New research shows that back tea contains aromatic compounds that may help to lower stress levels and improve mood.

12 July, 2018

Vitamin B6 could aid dream recall

Taking vitamin B6 before bedtime could help you remember your dreams better – but just how it works is still something of a mystery.

1 May, 2018

Nature sounds help us relax – here’s how

New UK research has found that listening to natural sounds helps calm and reset the body systems that control our flight-or-fright and rest-digest responses.

3 April, 2017

Veggies every day keep stress at bay

Eating just three to four servings of vegetables daily is associated with a lower incidence of psychological stress, especially in women.

24 March, 2017

Prebiotics could help you cope with stress

If you are under stress, getting more prebiotics in your daily diet could result in a happier tummy and more restful sleep.

20 February, 2017

Lasting stress relief? Supplements may help

In a recent study, a blend of magnesium, probiotics, vitamins and minerals was found to relieve stress and fatigue levels – a benefit maintained even after supplementation stopped.

7 November, 2016

Probiotic fermented milk helps alleviate exam stress

A new study has shown that a daily probiotic drink given to medical students in the run up to exams helped to reduce stress-induced stomach upsets.

15 August, 2016

Rhodiola reduces mild anxiety and stress in students

Daily supplementation with Rhodiola rosea extract may help us cope with stress as well as improve other symptoms associated with mild anxiety, according to a new study from the UK.

27 June, 2016

How to deal with stress? Let it go!

New evidence shoes how you perceive and react to stressful events is more important to your health than how frequently you encounter stress.

29 February, 2016